Exhibitions

Untitled Group Exhibition

“Untitled” has two meanings: “an artwork title that is commonly seen in contemporary art” and “a person without a title”. As indicated by its title, artworks showcased in this exhibition are created by contemporary artists who identify themselves as untitled artists and looking for a greater exposure for their art. This group exhibition is the final stage of last year’s open call campaign “The Untitled Artists” which was launched by Our Gallery in August. During the five months application period, we received nearly two hundred applications and found that there is no shortage of potential artists. The selection process without pre-screening applicants’ resumes, but only reviewed their artworks. Ultimately, ten artists were selected into this group exhibition (names are listed in alphabetical order): Armechan, Caine Wong, CyrusNONAME, Ingrid Wong, Jennifer Chow, Lee Ping Sun, Mitchell Hung, Simon Yung, So Kwok Kin, and Wong Wai Kin. The artworks created by these ten artists are in different many ways - in terms of their forms, mediums, contents, styles and ways of presentation. The common similarity of these works in somehow reflects the talent and creativity of their creators. With this exhibition, we’re delighted to introduce a group of talented Hong Kong artists and their outstanding works to the public. They are sensitive to different topics and each of them tries to express their own concerns and thoughts through their arts. We hope that the ten artists’ messages can be delivered to the audiences, strike a chord among them and trigger their imaginations.

Beyond Appearances: Luigi Giacobbe Solo Exhibition

2nd December 2016 - 31st December 2016

Artist-Monk: Ikko Fukuyama Solo Exhibition

14th January 2017 - 1st April 2017

Ways of Seeing: Tang Zhigang and Followers

8 April 2017 - 30 June 2017

Colours, Lines, Dimensions

24th March 2018 - 30 June 2018

Beyond Appearances: Luigi Giacobbe Solo Exhibition

This solo exhibition is a collection of the latest works by Italian artist Luigi Giacobbe. From Giacobbe’s paintings, one sees that art is always a product of the integration between the artwork, the producer and the observer. Giacobbe drew his inspiration from his life experiences and his journeys around the world. He intends to show us what appears to be ordinary and obvious, may not be the case in reality. He invites the observers to look through his lens as his works are reconstructions of the scenes he sees in his everyday life: decaying cities with worn-out streets, walls, metal structures and buildings. Through his works of art, Giacobbe reveals how art, communicating through forms and symbols, can express the richness of the human soul. This exhibition is co-presented with Consulate General of Italy in Hong Kong and Macau, as part of the Bellissima Italia Programme 2016. Luigi Giacobbe (Italian, 1962-) Luigi Giacobbe graduated from Liceo Artistico Istituto Pantheon in Rome in 1982. His works were well received by various Roman art exponents when they were exhibited in Rome in the early 1980s. Subsequently, in 1987, he was invited to join the art festival “100 Pittori di via Margutta” (100 painters of Via Margutta) as a guest participant. In 1985, Giacobbe created a collection of works, including the “L’Arte della Fantasia” (The Art of Imagination), which laid the conceptual foundation of his art: a constant metamorphosis between the external attraction and the artist’s imagination. He moved to Paris in 1989. Giacobbe lived there for five years and participated in numerous art events, including “Salon des indépendants 1991” and “Le Salon d'Automne 1992” held at the Grand Palais. Some of his works became part of the permanent collections of Galerie Rambaud and Galerie Yves FAY in Paris. In 1995, Giacobbe moved to Japan. The influences of Japanese culture can be seen in his works. The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (BTMU) exhibited a series of sculptures created by Giacobbe in Ginza, Tokyo in 1997. The exhibition, named “Le Trois Femmes” (The Three Women), lasted for a month. The exhibited works are responses to the modern world, a world that is featured by a high level of homogeneity and technology-oriented culture. Giacobbe lived in Japan for five years before moving to Moscow in 2000. The rich colours of Moscow enhanced his visual experiences. Giacobbe frequently visited the famous Red Square, which enabled him to fully experience the histories and emotions carried by the historical place. His stay in Moscow was characterised by a profound interest in Soviet Art (Soviet Realism). He did some intensive research on Soviet Art and collected an extensive number of works created by painters who lived in the transitional period between the Soviet Union and current Russia. Between 2000 and 2002, Giacobbe made Moscow his home. The city offered unforgettable emotions to him. Giacobbe arrived in Seoul in 2003. He spent five years rediscovering the material connection with the art. His works were exhibited in Gana Art Gallery in 2005. In 2007, he had his solo exhibition, “L’Arte della Fantasia” (Art of Fantasy), at Galerie PICI. He produced large size works which engaged three forces: graphics, painting and sculpture. By enclosing the three forces into his painting, Giacobbe managed to express the freedom that often can only be seen in art. His works are visually striking and showed the artistic evolution in the perception of imagination. In 2008, he moved from Seoul to Manila. His solo exhibition “La Tentazione Dei Colori” (The Temptation of Colour) was held in Ayala Museum in 2009. He still actively collaborates with the museum today. Luigi Giacobbe has been living and working in Hong Kong since 2015.
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Artist-Monk: Ikko Fukuyama Solo Exhibition

Zen teaches us not merely to hear, but to listen; not just to look, but to see; not only to think, but to experience; and above all not to cling to what we know, but to accept and rejoice the world we may encounter. Zen has been called “a teaching without words” because Zen monks train their students to break the bonds of dualistic and logical thinking in order to reach the state of enlightenment. Words are not taken as direct truth, but rather as one of many ways to convey meaning through experience. Art is a part of Zen training and has a long history. About one thousand years ago, Chinese Zen monks occasionally used painting as a teaching tool drawing a circle in the air to suggest more than words could explain or creating ink paintings for their students to meditate upon. The first Japanese artists to work in ink monochrome paintings were Zen monks who painted in dramatically bold, seemingly impetuous, and bluntly immediate manner, to express their religious views and personal convictions. The paintings produced by Zen monks are functional, there is a direct connection between the images and Zen teaching. It has long been believed in East Asia that brush and ink reveal the true character of the artist so that viewing a painting is a form of communication with the inner spirit of the person who created it. Ikko Fukuyama is a Zen monk who trained at Eiheiji, the head Temple of Soto Zen School. He also graduated from Tokyo University of the Arts (PhD in Japanese Painting). The life of Zen and the inner spirit of Fukuyama may be implied in his landscape paintings. He studied and practiced Zen for a long time and was raised in an environment of Zen. “I do not know whether my art is affected by Zen religion but it could be a blood of mine”, said by the artist. **If you are interested in purchasing Fukuyama's artworks, please contact KAMIYA ART: info@kamiya-art.com
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Ways of Seeing: Tang Zhigang and Followers

English art critic John Berger (1926-2017) suggested that the way we see things is affected by what we know or what we believe. We never look at just one thing; we are always looking at the relation between things and ourselves. This exhibition stages the works from contemporary Chinese artist Tang Zhigang and his followers, Su Jie, Su Jia Shou and Su Jia Xi. The four artists discussed the boundaries of abstract expressionism and figurative art. They are impressed with the power of abstract expressionism by Mark Rothko (1903-1970) but on the other hand, they have not been given up figurative depiction. The works presented in this exhibition are showing their unique styles and own expressions of art. Although every artwork embodies a way of seeing, our perception or appreciation of an artwork depends upon our own way of seeing. "Ways of Seeing” is a metaphor for driving the viewers to develop their own ways of seeing from each artists’ works, and thereby experience the visual fascination of art. Tang Zhigang Since the nineties of last century, Tang created a large number of impressive, humorous and sharp allegory paintings, such as "Children in Meeting”, "Never Grow Up", and “Chinese Fairy Tale". He depicts ignorant, naughty, innocent children in serious political life and military scenes, to satirize the childish, anti-intellectual, absurd and profound loneliness of adult world. In the new series “Booming and Glory", we can still see the continuation of "Children in Meeting", but the simple background is transformed to the blooming flowers. The artist wants to paint it even more freely in which to express his disdain for the dogmatic college teaching. Su Jie Su Jie is skilled at capturing dramatic moments in daily scenes, with very expressive colours and quick brush strokes, conveys a sense of immediacy. His paintings often combined with a text or a sentence that originated from an excerpt or a thought. This forms an intertextual relationship between the thoughts and the scenes depicted in the painting, and also provides an intertwined experience with reading and sensation. Su Jia Shou In Su’s points of view, painting aims not to describe or express something but is a practice and a process that can open the mind of oneself. He often depicts part of realistic objects in the paintings. His paintings are generally enveloped in cold grey tone, with scattered light spots, like the faded old photos and remnants. Su Jia Xi Su Jia Xi believes painting is an introspective process and a dialogue with oneself. His paintings are full of misty water, woods and glowing glitter that created a mysterious and ethereal atmosphere.
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The Predicament of Lingnan School of Art: Kenny Mak Solo Exhibition

The fourth generation artist Kenny Mak, the follower of the third generation master Lo Ching Yuen, who cherishes the unique Hong Kong pop culture and trying to merge Lingnan Art techniques into his paintings to express his passion of Hong Kong. This exhibition covering three main themes of Kenny’s works. The theme of “Hong Kong Local Culture” is the highlights of this exhibition. Each piece of works is closely related to the local pop culture. We hope the audiences not only appreciate the art itself but also explore the hidden messages behind every artwork. About Kenny Mak...... At the very beginning, Kenny self-studied the techniques of Lingnan Art but he met the bottleneck very soon. He understood that he will not have progress without learning from Lingnan Art masters. He admired Lo Ching Yuen for years, thence to quit his job and went to Taiwan to follow master Lo. Few years later, he grasped the basic techniques of Lingnan Art. In 2014, Kenny depicted a famous Hong Kong dish with the techniques of Lingnan Art. This artwork gained Hong Kong Fine Art Prize which co-organised by South Korean art museum and Hong Kong art gallery. Kenny was encouraged by this honour and continues his pursuit of art. Thereafter, he staged his solo exhibition in Namsong Art Museum, South Korea. In 2017, Kenny’s painting “Army” has been chosen into Ink Global, which will be exhibited with other 500 world top ink artworks, at Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre. The artist described himself is now completely returning to the art world.
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Colours, Lines, Dimensions

This exhibition is the highlight of the year and to celebrate the re-opening of Our Gallery after renovation. Some of the influential Italian artists’ works will be displayed in this exhibition, including Alberto Burri, Lucio Fontana, and Enrico Castellani etc. The artworks demonstrate the aesthetic ideas of colours, lines and dimensions from modern Italian art. List of artists: Alberto Burri, Alberto Biasi, Agostino Bonalumi, Enrico Castellani, Giacomo Balla, Lucio Fontana and Piero Dorazio.
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